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La Meri

The collection consists of correspondence, printed materials, photographs and photo albums, scrapbooks and audio tapes chronicling the career of Russell Meriwether Hughes from her early childhood in the early 1900s through her retirement in the 1980s.

"La Meri" Finding Aid

This Library Resource is only a sample of what can be found at the Texana Genealogy Desk. The vast collection explores Russell Meriwether Hughes’ life, accomplishments, and profound influence on the world of dance. We encourage you to research the collection on your own for a better understanding on this remarkable dancer, choreographer, teacher, and poet. Finding Aid

Information Regarding the Collection

The collection consists of correspondence, printed materials, photographs and photo albums, scrapbooks and audio tapes chronicling the career of La Meri from her early childhood in the early 1900s through her retirement in the 1980s. Many of the materials in the collection are undated. Printed materials include programs, brochures and reviews of performances, articles about La Meri, and articles and books written by her. Also included in the collection are materials from her sister, Lillian Hughes Newcomer. 

For more information on the “La Meri” Collection, please visit the Texana/Genealogy Desk at the San Antonio Central Library. 
(210) 207-2500

Links to Other Repositories

New York Public Library La Meri Papers

Charles Miller: Dancer, choreographer, teacher, and close friend of Russell Meriwether Hughes Online Archive of California

La Meri, “I remember C.I.A….” [postmark, 1971] Texas Womens University Library

 

Images of La Meri

Russell Meriwether Hughes

   Russell Meriwether Hughes, born on May 13, 1899 in Louisville, Kentucky, moved with her family to San Antonio in 1910 and in 1924 made her professional stage debut dancing prologues to silent movies at the Rialto Theatre. where she assumed the stage name La Meri. She moved to New York City played the “subway circuit” with the dance company of Maria Montero, and was a featured performer in Keith Times’ vaudeville act and in Shubert’s “A Night in Spain.”

   The peak of her career was from the late 1920s through the early 1940s when she received widespread acclaim during worldwide international tours traveling to Mexico, Central and South America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Tasmania, India and the Far East. In 1940 she established the School of Natya with Ruth St. Denis in New York City where she taught and performed with her company the Five Natyas and presented noted guest speakers. lShe also taught and lectured at Columbia University, Connecticut College, New York University and the Juilliard School of Music. lShe was a distinguished poet and author of several articles on dance as well as textbooks on dance techniques. Her text “Spanish Dancing,” published in 1969 is generally considered to be the definitive work on the subject.l

   She retired to Cape Cod, Massachusetts in 1970 where she established Ethnic Dance Arts, Inc. which produced annual Ethnic Dance Festivals each summer. In 1972 she was awarded the prestigious Capezio Dance Award and in 1973 was given an honorary citation by Texas Governor Dolph Briscoe recognizing her for artistic achievement. In 1984 she moved back to San Antonio where she died four years later at the age of 89 on January 7, 1988.