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COVID-19

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic Information

COVID-19 TESTING

  • Call COVID-19 hotline 210-207-5779 (Mon-Fri 8am-4pm; Sat-Sun 8am-12pm) for general information and guidance.
  • Determine if you should be tested for COVID-19 with this online self-screening tool.
  • Call 210-233-5970 or register online for a free test.
  • Check for updates on COVID-19 Testing or call 311.
  • No-cost, no-appointment walk-up testing available everyday starting Monday July 6, 10 am - 2 pm. Only persons with COVID-19 symptoms will be tested at Walk-Up Testing Sites below. Limit 300 people per location per day.
    • ​​​​​Kazen Middle School, 1520 Gillette Blvd., San Antonio 78224
    • Cuellar Community Center, 5626 San Fernando St., San Antonio 78237

 

CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC NEWS

TRACKING COVID-19

CDC COVID-19 VIDEOS

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Phase 2 @SAPL: All library locations other than Pruitt provide contact-free pickup services and nine locations offer computer access starting June 16

WELCOME

This guide aims to provide current information and reliable resources for understanding and responding to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Updated information and guidance will be provided as they become available from public health authorities.

  • Governor Abbott issued two new statewide executive orders: (1) an Executive Order that requires masks and (2) a proclamation that prohibits gatherings of more than 10 people. Both are effective at noon, July 3, 2020.
  • San Antonio / Bexar County Offices of Emergency Management sent the following Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) on July 3: "The State of Texas now mandates all residents to wear masks, punishable by a fine of $250."
  • The current "Stay Home Work Safe" orders (Fifth Addendum to 8th Declaration of Public Health Emergency Regarding COVID-19) state that all people 10 years or older shall wear a cloth face covering over their nose and mouth when in a public place where it is difficult to maintain six feet of distance from others, such as when visiting a grocery store/pharmacy or working in areas that involve close proximity with other coworkers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advise face coverings for people 2 years or older: CDC Guidance for Daily Activities to Reduce Risk of COVID-19.
  • The public is invited to participate in the COVID-19 Community Survey online or by calling 210-207-5779. Results from this survey will help the City of San Antonio's public health specialists and policymakers recommend effective measures over the next few months.

WHAT IS COVID-19?
Coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19, is caused by a novel coronavirus that was first identified as part of an investigation into an outbreak in Wuhan, China, in December 2019.

WHAT'S A CORONAVIRUS?
Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). A novel coronavirus is a new strain that has not been previously identified in people.

HOW DOES COVID-19 SPREAD?
The novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 spreads very easily and sustainably from person-to-person.

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet) through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
  • COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms.
  • It may be possible that a person can become infected by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads, but we are still learning more about this virus. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-covid-spreads.html
  • Most people infected with COVID-19 have symptoms no more serious than the common cold or flu and make a full recovery. However, older adults and those with chronic medical conditions or weakened immune systems of any age are at higher risk for severe illness and death from this novel coronavirus. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/high-risk-complications.html

TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF AND FAMILY
Currently there’s no vaccine for COVID-19, and the best way  to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.

  • Stay home as much as possible and put distance between yourself and other people (at least 6 ft) when you must go out while COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This social distancing is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick (see above).
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT OTHERS IN YOUR COMMUNITY

  • Stay home if you are sick, except to get medical care. Learn what to do if you are sick.
  • Wear a cloth face covering* in public spaces such as grocery stores where it's difficult to maintain a safe distance of 6 ft from others. This is to protect people around you if you are infected but do not have symptoms. Face coverings add an extra layer of protection in the community setting but do not replace social distancing as the main preventive measure.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.

*CDC recommends that people wear a cloth face covering to cover their nose and mouth in the community setting. Surgical masks and N95 respirators are in short supply and should be reserved for healthcare workers or other medical first responders.

ACTIVITIES RANKED IN RELATIVE RISK LEVEL FOR COVID-19

AVOID FAKE NEWS AND HEALTH MISINFORMATION

Since COVID-19 is such a fast-moving pandemic, rumors and misinformation sometimes from seemingly reliable sources are inevitable. It's best to rely on information from authoritative sources such as the Center for Disease Control (CDC) , the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the World Health Organization (WHO). Below are some critical-thinking steps to help you sort out facts from fake news.